Site menu:

Site search

Categories

May 2017
M T W T F S S
« Dec    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Blogroll

The race for rare metals is on - A view from Japan

Demand for rare earth metals is expected to accelerate due to growing use of next generation green technologies. High performance batteries, wind power generators and many other high-tech devices use rare earth metals. Japan is the leader in a number of green technologies.

China monopolizes the supply chain for rare earth. There has been growing concern in Japan about the 800 pound panda in the room. In recent years Japanese trading companies and manufactures have been taking the initative to secure other sources of rare earth metals. The Japanese government has recognized the importance of rare metals for Japan’s industrial economy and has drawn up a strategy to secure a stable supply of rare metals.

Japan’s approach to the emerging competition for rare earth resources while haphazard until recently, is not alarmist. Japanese industry and government recognize the need for some kind of resource diplomatic strategy.

This article was published in the October 27th, 2009 edition of the Economist.

English Translation

President Obama’s New Green Deal initiative has placed greater focus on the next generation of environmentally friendly plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles.

The key to realizing this technology lies in the development of high capacity and highly efficient lithium batteries. The energy output of Toyota’s Prius nickel-metal hydride battery is low with the traveling distance of the car limited. High energy lithium batteries would improve the car’s performance. Battery makers have formed various strategic relationships with automobile companies in the battle to develop lithium batteries.

The lithium battery’s cathode contains the rare metal lithium and it is expected that demand for lithium will sore in the future. Lithium exists in only a few places. Nearly 40% is located in Bolivia. That’s 5.4 million tons of the worlds 13.4 million tons of known lithium.

Securing lithium is a critical issue for a resource poor Japan. Last June, a Japanese trade mission comprised of government affiliated organizations and the private sector which included representatives from Mitsubishi; Sumitomo; Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC) and Nippon Export and Investment Insurance (NEXI) proposed to the Bolivian government to provide the technology, funds, and infrastructure to develop the world’s largest lithium deposit at the Uyuni salt pans.

Japan is not the only country whose representatives have visited Bolivia. In February, French President Sarkozy met with Bolivia’s President Morales. The giant French group Bollore which plans to manufacture electric vehicles is currently negotiating an agreement with Bolivian mining officials to secure lithium. South Korea’s Lucky Gold Star Group and BMW, which has a strong presence in South America, have taken a very active interest in Bolivia. It’s been reported that China will provide the funds to construct a school in President Morales’s home town and has proposed to supply Bolivia with military vehicles and ships. It’s expected that China will surpass Japan in the production of cars and will become the number one car maker in the world. If electric vehicles are to become the next-generation strategic export item for China, it’s absolutely essential that China secure lithium.

The Bolivian government is in the process of comparing the proposals from several governments. President Morales would like either lithium batteries or electric cars to be manufactured in Bolivia. His ultimate aim is to have manufacturing facilities and technical know-how transferred to his country.

“Bolivia is a high risk country. Even if an agreement is made, the price could suddenly be raised. We never know what they will say next,” said a major Japanese trading company executive. While he recognizes that Bolivia has vast reserves of lithium, he’s concerned about emerging resource nationalism.

Next-generation technology is impossible without rare metals. While the competition to acquire energy resources and base metals such as iron and copper continues, the race to obtain rare metal has started.

Rare metal is defined as a metal whose known reserves are in small quantities, is in high demand but is difficult to extract due to economic and technical reasons and is expected to have increased demand due to technological innovations. The Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry’s mining commission has designated 31 types of ore as rare metals. Particularly scarce are a group of 17 elements collectively known as rare earth metals.

There are concerns in Japan over securing a stable supply of neodymium and dysprosium, two rare earth alloys that are used to make powerful permanent magnets. China controls 97% of the worlds supply of those metals.

Permanent magnets are absolutely vital in the production of renewable energy devices such as the motors for hybrid cars and electric vehicles, and turbines for wind power generators. Japan is the world leader in permanent magnet technology, however the country is extremely reliant on China’s supply of rare earth alloys.

China has been tightening restrictions on the export of rare earth alloys. Rare earth production continues to grow in China. From 2002 to 2008 production of rare earth increased by 60%, yet exports since 2003 have continued to decline. Chinese domestic consumption of rare earth is surging and it’s absolutely essential  estimated that production will approximately equal domestic consumption by 2012.

It’s clear that China’s national strategy is to “withhold resources.” In 2006 the 11th five year plan called for greater protection of rare earth, tungsten, tin and antimony and the promotion of high-tech industries that use rare earth.

In August, the world was shocked over the prospect that China would restrict rare earth exports. The Chinese agency which determines export restrictions, the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT), denied that the export of rare earth such as dysprosium and terbium would be banned. However, this incident shows that China could restrict the export of rare earth.

In First China Business Post, China’s financial newspaper, MIIT announced that it plans to reduce the number of companies that mine rare earth from the present level of 200-300 companies to 20 companies. An executive working at major Japanese trading company pointed out that “the central government wants to strengthen its control over the industry by having about 4 conglomerates dominate the industry.”

At the end of June, the United States and the European Union jointly launched a suit against China with the World Trade Organization (WTO) claiming that world prices have increased as a result of China’s unfair restrictions on the export of rare metals. According to international trade rules, China should allow access to rare metals. The Chinese Ministry of Commerce deflected accusations by pointing out that “China was taking measures to protect its environment and resources.”

China has been busy acquiring overseas resources. Its resource development group, the East China Mineral Exploration & Development Bureau, increased its stake in Arafura Resources, an Australian company that mines rare metal, rare earth and uranium, to 25% in June. In July, China Investment Corporation (CIC), the state-owned Sovereign Wealth Fund, purchased a 17.2% stake in Tech Resources, Canada’s largest resource company. Teck mines coal, copper, zinc, gold and molybdenum and plans to explore for and develop rare earth and rare metals such as tantalum.

This is the first of two parts.

Real Japanese

米オバマ大統領が打ち出したグリーンニューディール政策の影響などから、家庭用コンセントから充電可能なプラグインハイブリット車(PHEV)や電気自動車(EV)など次世代環境対応車への注目が集まっている。

そのカギを握るのは、自動車用の高性能・大容量リチウムイオン電池の開発だ。トヨタ自動車の「プリウス」など既存のハイブリッド車(HEV)にはニッケル水素電池が搭載されているが、エネルギー密度が低く、電池による走行距離が短い。そこで、エネルギー密度が高いリチウムイオン電池が求められている。自動車、電池メーカーは多様な戦略的提携関係を構築しながら、開発競争にしのぎを削っている。

リチウムイオン電池の正極材にはレアメタル(希少金属)のリチウムを使う。その需要は今後、爆発的に拡大すると予想されるが、問題はその確保にある。リチウムは偏在性が極めて高い。世界の埋蔵資源量は1340万トンとされるが、その4割に当たる540万トンはボリビアが保有している。

資源を持たない日本にとって、リチウムの確保はまさに死活問題だ。今年6月、三菱商事、住友商事、石油天然ガス・金属鉱物資源機構(JOGMEC)、日本貿易保険(NEXI)などからなる官民合同使節団が、ボリビア政府に対し、世界最大級のリチウム資源量を持つウユニ塩湖の資源開発に、技術・資金協力、インフラ整備の提案を行った。

「ボリビア詣で」を行っているのは日本だけではない。フランスは2月、サルコジ大統領がボリビアのモラレス大統領と会議、EVを手がける仏コングロマリットのボロレはボリビア鉱産省と資源確保のために交渉中だ。韓国のLGグルプ、南米に強いドイツのBMWの積極的に働きかけている。中国はモラレス大統領の故郷に学校建設資金を支援し、軍用車や船舶の提供を提案したという。中国は近く、日本を抜き世界最大の自動車生産国となる見通し。中国が次世代戦略輸出品ともくろむEVを生産するうえで、リチウムの確保は不可欠である。

ボリビア政府は各国の提案を天秤に掛けているところだが、モラレス大統領は、リチウムイオン電池かEVのメーカーがボリビア工場に進出することを求めている。ここには生産・開発技術を自国に移転したいという狙いが読み取れる。

「ボリビアはリスクが大きい。開発に漕ぎ着けたとしても、突然価格をつり上げるなど、何を言い出すかわらない」。日本の大手商社幹部はリチウム埋蔵量のポテンシャルは認めながらも、資源ナショナリズムへの懸念を隠さない。

次世代技術に不可欠なレアメタル。世界でその争奪が活発化してきた。鉄、銅などのベースメタルやエネルギーなどの資源確保競争に続く、新たなステージの幕開けである。

レアメタルは、1)存在量が希、2)技術・経済的な理由から抽出困難で、現状の需要が高い、3)技術革新に伴い新需要が予測されるーーなどの金属の総称である。経済産業省鉱業審議会は特に31種を挙げ、17種あるレアアースは1種と扱っている。

レアアースのうち、その安定供給が懸念されているのが、高性能永久磁石をつくるために必要なネオジムやジスプロシウムである。こられは中国が世界の97%を供給する寡占支配にある。

永久磁石は、HEVやEVのモーター、風力発電用タービンなど再生可能エネルギー関連機器に不可欠だ。日本の永久磁石の製造技術は世界一だが、資源は中国に大きく依存している。

その中国は今、レアアースの輸出規制を強めている。中国のレアアース生産量は伸び続け、2008年は02年比で約60%増加したが、輸出は03年以降 減り続けている。レアアースの国内消費量が急増し、12年ごろに生産量と国内消費量がほぼ等しくなると予想されることが、この背景にある。

中国は国家戦略として「資源囲い込み」を明確に示している、06年の第11次5ヵ年計画(06~10年)は、レアアースやタングステン、錫、アンチモンの資源保護を強化し、ハイテク産業にレアアースの応用を推進するとした。

8月には、中国レアアースの輸出を禁止するとの観測が浮上し、世界に衝撃が走った。輸出割り当てを決める当局の工業・情報化省(MIIT)は、懸念されているジスプロシウムやテルビウムなどのレアアース輸出禁止は打ち消したが、輸出規制はありうるという見解を示した。

一方、中国の経済紙「第一財経日報」は、MIITが近々公表する「09~15年レアアース工業発展計画」で、現在200~300社あるレアアースの分離抽出に従事する企業数を20社まで削減する方針だと伝えた。大手商社幹部は「中央政府管理下の4社程度のコングロマリットがコントロールするというのが業界の見方だ。政府の管理をさらに強めている」と分析する。

6月下旬、米国と欧州連合(EU)はレアメタルなど輸出を不当に制限し、国際価格の上昇を招いているとして、中国を世界貿易機関(WTO)に提訴した。国際貿易ルールに基づき、中国に門戸を開かせようとするものだが、中国商務省は「環境や資源を保護するための措置だ」と論点をかわしている。

一方で中国は、海外の資源確保にも奔走している。中国の資源開発グループ、有色金属華東地質捜査局(ECE)は6月、豪州の北部準州にレアメタル、レアアース、ウランの資源を保有するアラフラ・レソーシズに25%出資した。さらに、政府系ファンドである中国投資有限公司(CIC)は資源分野に投資対象を拡大し、7月には石炭に加え銅や亜鉛、金、モリブデンなどを扱うカナダの資源大手テック・リソーシズの17.2%の株式を取得した。同社もタンタルなどレアメタル・レアアースの探鉱・開発に乗り出している。

Back to Top ↑