Site menu:

Site search

Categories

May 2017
M T W T F S S
« Dec    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Blogroll

Company in Japan develops machine than can precisely cut any material or object

A small company in Tokyo has developed a precision diamond wire cutting machine that has received a lot of attention in Japan.

There’s almost nothing that can’t be cut with Ryowa’s cutting machine. Glass, metals, rubber, wood, plastics and ceramics are just a few of the types of natural and composite materials that can be precisely cut, safely. The potential applications of Ryowa’s cutting machine in science and industry are endless.

This article was published in the November, 2009 edition of Business Ascii.

English Translation

A cut-away model lets you see the interior of something that you normally could not see. And you may think that the object was cut into two equal parts, but this is often not the case. There are any number of ways to cut an object; for example, by using a circular saw equipped with the latest water jet or a plasma cutter. However, it is very difficult to cleanly cut an object into two exact pieces.

According to Mr. Wada, president of Ryowa, “even though an object was cut in half, the cut may not be clean and cracks may appear. After cutting, it’s impossible to fit both parts back together again. In many cases, if one part breaks and the cross section of the other part remains intact, it’s often made to look like the object was cut into two neat pieces. With our machine both parts will fit together again perfectly. In one cut you can make a cut-away model. Our advanced cutting machine can cut anything except water and air”. Ryowa’s cutting machine can precisely cut anything: from metals, glass and wood to ceramics.

The secret of this machine is the diamond dust that covers the edge of a steel wire on the rotating cutting band. Ryowa’s diamond edged cutting machine can cut anything including easy to break light bulbs, porcelain and cameras that contain various materials and hard lenses. Such cutting technology can be used in any number of areas where you need a cut-away model to clearly see the inner composition of an object.

Suntory ordered a machine while it was still under development. “They   wanted to cut the bottle used for their product: “Suntory Old Whiskey.” Even though the weight of the filled bottles was the same, the amount of whiskey in each bottle was not. This is because the thickness of the bottles varied. In order to check the the thickness, a bottle would first have to be wrapped with cellophane and broken. With Ryowa’s advanced cutting machine, Suntory can now cut a bottle any way they liked.”

Ryowa’s cutting technology is also used in the tire industry. Rubber tires used by jumbo jets and trucks can blow out. To control the quality of their rubber tires, each maker has to keep a sample cross-section of a tire from every lot of rubber tires they produce. With Ryowa’s cutting technology they can have a precise record of their products.

Ryowa is located in Sumida ward. Before WWII, the textile industry was flourishing in that part of Tokyo and Sumida ward was a major production area for dress shirts. A relative of the current president established the company in 1919. The first product the company manufactured was a sewing machine.

Ryowa’s ability to produce unique products was established when the company manufacturing sewing machines. When Wada took over management of the company in 1955, Ryowa manufactured sewing machines that utilized a unique technology to make wigs. That machine was exported to 48 countries around the world and ended up controlling more than 90 percent of the world market.

After the war, Ryowa moved into a new market, cutting machines. In those days, the cloth from 100 dress shirts were stacked up and cut with a knife. However, the length of the cloth on the top and bottom of the pile would be different from the rest of the cloth. Customers were looking for a machine that could precisely cut every piece of the cloth in the pile.

To solve the problem, Ryowa developed a cloth-cutting machine whose blade rotated like a hand razor. Later, the company developed cutting machines for metal and wood. When the company provided miniaturized products to a number of smaller manufacturing companies, more people came to know Ryowa’s name.

A customer of Ryowa, who was using a band saw to cut wood for Japanese-style dressers, asked if a machine could be made that could cut a mirror like it was wood. At that time it was difficult to cut glass precisely. Using a diamond glass cutter would scratch or break the glass. Also it was impossible to cut curves into the glass. Wada thought that, by placing diamond dust on the end of a circular band saw, glass could be cut but this only would work for a short time until the saw’s wheel would break.

Then Wada came up with the idea of only covering the edge of a wire with diamond dust. Along the way, other improvements were made, such as using a special kind of rubber for the wheel itself. Eventually, the company perfected a cutting machine that could cut anything.

“When electrical spark welding began to be used for cutting in metal working, just being able to cut things didn’t have a future. With cutting technology an essential part of manufacturing, Ryowa developed a technology that surpassed anything that currently existed. Though Ryowa is a small company, by trying to be the best in the area of cutting, the way is open for great things,” said Wada.

Even though cutting machines were being improved all the time, there were still materials that could not be cut, such as ceramics. Electrical current cannot pass through ceramics, making it impossible for electrical arc machinery to cut such material. To solve the problem, metal dust was mixed into ceramics, (but then the whole idea of using ceramics was lost.)

After Ryowa developed it’s advanced diamond wire cutting machine, someone in the ceramics industry paid the company a visit to see what the machine could do. Cutting a ceramic object, which used to take three days, now took only five minutes. Glass and ceramics could now be cut.

However, there was still one type of glass that could not be cut: laminated glass. It was nearly impossible to cleanly cut two layers of glass that were laminated with resin. Since laminated glass could not be cut, if the size of the glass was wrong, nothing could be done to correct it.

So cutting multiple layers of glass at the same time, let alone trying to cleanly cut layers of glass strengthened with resin, was nearly an impossible task. After three years had gone by, the chief of manufacturing along with the employees, told Wada that “we shouldn’t be wasting any more time with this project.” At the end of 1994, with the economy getting worse, the president announced that Ryowa was halting the development of a laminated glass cutting machine.

However, during the following year a major event occurred, the Great Hanshin Earthquake. Wada couldn’t take his eyes off the television news and what he noticed was the broken glass. Many people were injured from broken glass from collapsed buildings. He said, “laminated glass would have been cheaper if it was easier to cut. And if it was more widely used, a tragedy could have been avoided.”

So the project was restarted. Every kind of cutting technology was looked into to develop a machine that would cut “laminated glass” and eventually Ryowa succeeded.

“The machine was made small enough so that not only glass manufacturers but local glass shops could use it. The laminated glass industry was delighted with Ryowa’s newest machine. Later, Ryowa received the Small Business Award for new products and technology and for demonstrating its unique creative ability. The company also received an award from Japan’s Science and Technology agency.

Ryowa’s cutting machine does not only cut materials that could not be cut. Their machine is used on the Antarctic exploration ship, “Shirase” to cut ice core samples collected at 3000 meters below the surface of the Antarctic ice cap. According to Wada, “ice core samples have to be precisely cut across their length. If the cut is not smooth, light will not properly reflect off the ice and an accurate analysis cannot be made.”

Ryowa’s technology is also proving to be useful in the search for natural resources such as oil and ore and mine rock samples can now be cut and analyzed for mineral content. “Our mission is to provide the technology that enables people to see the hidden side of things. When it comes to cutting we are the best,” says Wada. Yet, behind the boast, “there is nothing we can not cut,” there is the satisfaction of being able to take on such a challenge.

Real Japanese

普段は見えない内部が見えるカットモデル。「真っ二つ」に切断したかのように思えるものでも、実はそうではない場合が多いという。丸鋸から最新のウォータージェット、プラズマ切断など、ものを切るにはさまざまな方法がある。しかし、最小の切断面で断面をきれいに、文字通り「真っ二つ」にすることは非常に難しい。

「切ることはできても、切断面がきたなくなったり、割れたりする。切ったものを重ねあわせて元の姿にすることはなかなかできません。片方をこわして断面をきれいにして、二つに切ったように見せていることが多い。しかし、うちの機械で切ったものはぴたりと合わさる。だから、一回で二つのカットモデルができるんです」と語るのは「水と空気以外切れないものはない」というリョーワの和田公男会長。「切る」ことにこだわり、金属、ガラス、木材からセラミックスまで、なんでも精密に切ることができる高機能切断機を開発してきた。

その秘密は帯状になった平鋼線の狭い先端部にダイヤモンドの粉をつけ、その平鋼線を回転させるという仕組みにある。内部に硬いレンズをはじめさまざまな素材が使われているカメラ、割れやすい電球、陶磁器などあらゆるものを切断できるダイヤカットマシン。この切断技術は中が見えない製品の構造を、一目瞭然に見せることができるカットモデルのほかに、さまざまな分野に使われている。

開発当初に早速そのマシンを注文してきたのがサントリーだったという。「ウイスキーの“ダルマ”の瓶を切断したいという要望でした。重量で充填するので中身の量は同じはずなのに違いが出る。瓶の厚さが均等ではなかったんですね。それまでは瓶にセロテープをぐるぐる巻きにして割り、厚さを調べていましたが、この機械を使えば、いかようにも切ることできた」

この切断技術はタイヤ工業でも必要とされている。ジャンボジェットやトラックのタイヤをはじめ、バーストの危険性をはらんだゴムタイヤの品質管理のため、各メーカーはロットごとに切断したタイヤの見本を長期にわたって保持していなければならない。製品の断面を精密に残すことができるリョーワの技術が、そんなところにも発揮されているという。

リョーワのある墨田区は、戦前から繊維産業が盗んで、ワイシャツの製造でも一大生産地となっていたところだ。先代がこの地で仕事を始めたのは1919(大正80年)。工業用ミシンがそのスタートである。

「他社の真似をしない。人がやらないことをやる」という企業精神は、ミシンでも発揮された。和田会長が先代から経営を引き継いだ昭和30年代には、オリジナルの技術によるカツラ用ミシンを開発して世界48ヵ国に輸出、世界シェア9割以上という実績を残している。

戦後、ミシンの製造と縫製から一歩踏み出して、「切る」仕事へと参入した。その頃、ワイシャツなどは100枚ほど重ねて包丁のような刃物で切っていた。機械もあったが、切っているうちに布が持ち上がって上下に狂いが出る。正確に切ることができる裁断機が持ち望まれていたのだ。

そこでカミソリのような刃を回転させながら布を裁断するマシンを開発。その後、金属用、木材用と進化させた切断機は、町工場が多く、最初から小型化を目指したこともあって、「リョーワ」の名を広めていくことになる。

「あるとき、当社の木工用帯鋸盤を使って鏡台を作っていたお客様から、鏡も木のように自由に切れないか、という相談を受けました。当時、ガラスの切断はダイヤでガラスの表面に傷をつけて割るしかなく、曲線も切れ[ず、精度も低かったんです」

そこで和田氏は丸い鋼線にダイヤをつけて回転する方法を考案。しかし、ガラスは見事に切れたものの、ダイヤソーを回転させるホイール自体もすぐに切れてしまう。

そこで、平鋼線の先端だけにダイヤをつけることを考え出した。ホイール自体にも特殊ゴムを装着するなど改良を重ね、「なんでも切れる切断機」が完成した。

「金属加工では電気をスパークさせて切断する放電加工機が登場してきました。単に切るだけでは将来がない。どこにもできないことをやろうと、切ることに一層こだわっていった。切ることはものづくりの原点であり、基本。そこを徹底して追求すれば、小さな会社でも道は開けるとね」

切断機は進化していったが、それでも切れないものがあった。その代表がセラミックスだ。放電加工は通電しないものにはできない。そのために金属の粉を混ぜたセラミックスなども登場したが、それではセラミックス本来の長所を殺してしまう。リョーワのダイヤカットマシンを知ったセラミックス関係者が早速訪れてきた。試してみると、従来3日かかっていたというセラミックスの切断がわずか5分で終わったのだ。

ガラスが切れればセラミックスも切れることはわかっていたが、そのガラスにも課題が残っていた。それが合わせガラス。2枚のガラスに樹脂をはさんだ合わせガラスは、どうしてもきれいに切ることができなかった。

作ったあとでサイズの違いなど不都合が出ても、余ったところを切るというわけにはいかない。合わせガラスは、あらためて作り直しかない難儀なものだったのだ。

ガラス業界の要請もあって和田会長は、合わせガラス切断機の開発に着手していた。しかし、複数のガラスを同時に切り、しかも強力に張り合わるたための樹脂が間に入っているガラスをきれいに切るのは至難の業。3年半経ってもできなかった。「工場長をはじめ社員みんなが「もう道楽はやめてくれ」という。景気も悪くなっていったので、私自身、1994年の暮れに開発の中止を宣言しました。しかし、その翌年大きなできごとがありました」

1995年、阪神淡路大震災が起きる。テレビの報道に釘付けとなった和田会長だが、気になったのは建物のガラス。家の倒壊を免れても、ガラスの落下や片方によって多くの犠牲者や怪我人が出た。「合わせガラスが普及していたら、悲劇は防げたのではないか。もっと簡単にガラスが切れれば安くできる」

そんな思いが開発を再開させた。これまでの切断技術を注ぎ込んで「切れない」とされていた合わせガラスが切れる切断機の開発に成功。機械は縦型にして、ガラスメーカーだけでなく、町のガラス店でも使えるような小型化を図った。この合わせガラス切断機は業界を驚かせただけでなく、独創的な開発力を持った中小企業の底力を見せつけるものとなり、中小企業新技術・新製品賞を受賞。さらに科学技術庁長官賞を受賞することになった。

リョーワのダイヤカットマシンは、単に切れないものを切るだけが目的ではない。例えば、南極観測船「しらせ」が南極の地下3000mをボーリングした氷柱をカットしたのもこのダイヤカットマシンである。「あくまで断面がきれいになるように、正確に平行に切らなくはならない。滑らかに切らないと光がうまく当たらず正確な分析ができません」

地中から採掘されたサンプルを断面そのままにスライスすれば、そこにどんな鉱物資源があるかなどが詳しく調べられる。石油や鉱石などの資源探査にもつながる技術だという。「未知の世界を見えるようにすることも、私たちの役目であり、切ることの醍醐味もそこにあるんです」と和田会長。「切れないものはない」と豪語する裏には、そんな挑戦への喜びが詰まっているようだ。

Japanese Language Points

真っ二つ - cut into two equal parts

ウイスキーの“ダルマ”  - The whiskey is called “daruma” because the bottle is shaped like the potbellied founder of Buddhism.

進化していった -  In this case, the more appropriate translation is “develop.”

Back to Top ↑